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An Incidentaloma in the Cardiology Clinic

To the Editor: Paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors of neural crest origin.1, 2 In this report, we describe the exhaustive diagnostic workup involved in the diagnosis of a paraganglioma, which was first noted as an incidental mass in the proximity of left atrium on a routine transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). Case Report A 55-year-old man with a history […]

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Smoking Cessation: The Urgent Need for Increased Utilization of Varenicline

In the US, cigarette smoking causes 480,000 premature deaths annually, due mainly to a twofold increased risk of cardiovascular disease and a 20-fold increased risk of lung cancer.1 Public health efforts and effective cessation treatments–including behavioral counseling and medications–have decreased US rates to approximately 14%; they are markedly increasing in most developing countries.2 Smoking and the emerging […]

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The Clinical Course of Venous Thromboembolism May Differ According to Cancer Site

We hypothesized that the clinical course of venous thromboembolism in patients with active cancer may differ according to the specificities of primary tumor site. Aim and Methods We used data from RIETE (international registry of patients with venous thromboembolism) to compare the clinical venous thromboembolism-related outcomes during the course of anticoagulation in patients with one […]

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Menthol-Flavored Cigarettes: Potentially a Strong Trigger of Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia

Menthol-flavored cigarettes recently have received significant attention. Lower quit rates and higher relapse rates of smoking in people who smoke menthol-flavored cigarettes have been demonstrated.1 Additional disadvantages of menthol cigarettes also might exist. We present a lesson learned from a case we experienced: Menthol cigarette smoking might be a stronger trigger of acute eosinophilic pneumonia compared […]

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Anchor’s Away: A Case of Apparent Sinusitis

Diagnostic errors, defined as failures to reach timely and accurate explanations for a patient’s presentation, affect the majority of our patients, because most will experience at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime.1 We report the case of a patient who was inappropriately diagnosed with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis and later found to have lymphoma. We use […]

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