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The Call for a Physical Activity Vital Sign in Clinical Practice

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the most common shared occupational health risk is sedentary behavior. Physical inactivity increases the relative risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, hypertension, and osteoporosis by 45%, 60%, 30%, and 59%, respectively. Epidemiologic data suggest that physical inactivity is associated with an increased risk of 25 chronic diseases. Because approximately 90% […]

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Combating a Common Complaint (video)

Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder, manifesting as abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel function.  Despite affecting as many as 20% of adults, a lack of understanding of etiopathogenesis and evaluation strategies results in diagnostic uncertainty. In the August 2015 issue of The American Journal of Medicine, Sayuk and Gyawali detail modern […]

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tape measure

CME: Advances in the Management of Obesity

The American Journal of Medicine is offering a new continuing medical education course: Advances in the Management of Patients with Obesity. The course is based upon highlights from the 2013 Obesity Society Annual Meeting. Program Overview ObesityWeek 2013 was held on November 11–16, in Atlanta, GA and presented important data for the successful management of […]

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food

Treat or Eat: Food Insecurity, Cost-related Medication Underuse, and Unmet Needs

Cost-related medication underuse and food insecurity are common among chronically ill adults, with 1/3 of patients reporting one or both. Abstract Background Adults with chronic disease are often unable to meet medication and food needs, but no study has examined the relationship between cost-related medication underuse and food insecurity in a nationally representative sample. We […]

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Psychiatric Comorbidity and Other Psychological Factors in Patients with “Chronic Lyme Disease”

This study found that misdiagnosis of Lyme disease was common, resulting in repeated and unnecessary antibiotic treatment. Psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors were associated with functional outcomes. Abstract Background There is no evidence of current or previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection in most patients evaluated at university-based Lyme disease referral centers. Instead, psychological factors likely […]

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