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American Journal of Medicine Editor Joseph Alpert

‘Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics’: Biostatistics and Prognostication for Patients

Quite often patients ask me to predict the future outcome of their illness: “How long can I expect to live with this illness, doctor, or how dangerous is the procedure that you are recommending?” A facile answer involves quoting data taken from clinical or epidemiologic studies, but this kind of information is rarely useful for […]

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Bone Density Testing Is the Best Way to Monitor Osteoporosis Treatment

Bone mineral density assessment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is the most widely available and best validated clinical tool to diagnose osteoporosis, assess fracture risk, and monitor the skeletal effects of medications that reduce fracture risk.1 However, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry testing remains underused with osteoporosis undertreated. This treatment gap has reached crisis proportions,2 with recent disturbing evidence that […]

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The Clinical Relevance of Studies on Borrelia burgdorferi Persisters

In North America, Lyme disease is principally caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, hereafter referred to as “B. burgdorferi.” It is acquired by the bite of an infected Ixodes tick. The most common clinical manifestation is a skin lesion, referred to as “erythema migrans,” which is due to cutaneous infection with B. burgdorferi. Other objective manifestations may involve the nervous […]

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The Coronary (Cardiac) Care Unit at 50 Years: A Major Advance in the Practice of Hospital Medicine

This year, 2017, marks the 50th anniversary commemorating the publication of an article describing the results from the classic study by Killip and Kimball showing a reduction in mortality from acute myocardial infarction in patients sequestered in a specialized hospital unit1 at New York Hospital in New York City. Also described in the article was the […]

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Dr. Joseph S. Alpert

Stem Cell Therapy: The Phoenix in Clinical Medicine?

The Phoenix is a mythical bird with brightly colored plumage known in ancient Greek for the legend of its rebirth. After a long life, the Phoenix dies in a fire of its own making and then rises again reborn from the ashes. This myth parallels current feverish beliefs concerning the ability of stem cell therapy […]

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