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The New Trend in Medicine

During the 4 decades of my clinical training and practice of medicine, I always felt a sense of ownership and full responsibility in caring for my patients. What I have noticed over the past decade is a gradual transformation in our health care delivery system and in the attitude of our trainees. Hospitals are being governed […]

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Joseph S. Alpert

Statins and Diabetes: Wider Utilization Is Needed in Treatment and Prevention

  In this issue of The American Journal of Medicine, Hennekens et al1 address many cogent methodologic issues concerning whether there is a valid statistical association between statins and the development of diabetes. While they conclude that the current totality of evidence is insufficient to confirm a valid association, if such an association were present, the most plausible […]

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Salt, Tomato Soup, and the Hypocrisy of the American Heart Association

In no uncertain terms did the American Heart Association (AHA)1 condemn a recent study by Mente et al2 in The Lancet: “The findings in this study are not valid” … “a flawed study” … “you shouldn’t use it to inform yourself about how you’re going to eat” read some of the statements in the AHA’s comment. The study in […]

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close up of gloved hands filling a syringe

Ten Immunization-Related Tips in Outpatient Practice

Keeping up with immunization recommendations and implementing them can be an ongoing challenge for clinicians. Ten tips related to various immunizations given in the outpatient setting are presented, as well as resources useful to the clinician in his or her daily practice. Keeping up with immunization recommendations and implementing them are ongoing challenges for clinicians. […]

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Training Geriatric Cardiologists for an Aging Population: Time to Get Going

Our society is aging—20% of the US population will be aged more than 65 years by 2030, and the number of the “oldest old,” those aged more than 85 years, will triple by 2050. Cardiovascular disease prevalence increases exponentially with age, and direct costs for cardiovascular care in the United States will exceed $800 billion […]

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