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‘Urinary Tract Infection’ and the Microbiome

The current paradigm for managing uncomplicated “urinary tract infection” (“UTI”) is deeply flawed. “UTI” is ambiguously defined, and coupled with a belief that “bacteria are not normal inhabitants of the urinary tract,”1 the diagnosis often leads to unnecessary, harmful antibiotic treatment. Although bacteriuria identified by standard clinical cultures (which we will call standard bacteriuria) is central […]

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The Missing Antibody: The Pitfalls of ANCA Testing

A 44-year-old white woman presented to the hospital with acute shortness of breath while on a flight back to England from a holiday in Turkey. She denied having a productive cough, hemoptysis, or chest or calf pain. She was asthmatic, and her symptoms were improved by repeated administration of her salbutamol inhaler during the flight. […]

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Antimicrobial Use & C. difficile

Antimicrobial Use and Risk for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection Antimicrobial therapy after an episode of Clostridium difficile is common and significantly increases the risk of recurrent disease. The added risk associated with antimicrobial exposure (regardless of duration) should be considered if such therapy is contemplated. Abstract Background Although antimicrobial use during and immediately after Clostridium […]

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Supplements Provide Additional Information to AJM’s Audience

You may know that The American Journal of Medicine is published monthly, but do you know that several times a year the Journal also publishes supplements on specific topics? Supplements are collections of peer-reviewed research papers on a given area of medicine. To date in 2010, the Journal has published 3 supplements that are available […]

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