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Telemedicine Specialty Support Promotes Hepatitis C Treatment by PCPs

The Department of Veterans Affairs is the largest US provider of hepatitis C treatment. Although antiviral regimens are becoming simpler, hepatitis C antivirals are not typically prescribed by primary care providers. The Veterans Affairs Extension for Community Health Outcomes (VA-ECHO) program was launched to promote primary care–based hepatitis C treatment using videoconferencing-based specialist support. We […]

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Hepatitis

CME: Hepatitis C Screening, Diagnosis, Treatment & Management

The American Journal of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and Elsevier have assembled a multifaceted resource center for primary care physicians and specialists who want to learn more about Hepatitis C screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management. The site includes videos, links to research articles, and links to new guidelines. Check […]

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Hepatitis C Screening Trends

Hepatitis C Screening Trends in a Large Integrated Health System   Abstract Background As new hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapies emerge, only 1%-12% of individuals are screened in the US for HCV infection. Presently, HCV screening trends are unknown. Methods We utilized the Kaiser Permanente Mid-Atlantic States’ (KPMAS) data repository to investigate HCV antibody screening […]

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Management of Hepatitis C Virus-related Mixed Cryoglobulinemia

Mixed cryoglobulinemia is a chronic immune complex-mediated disease strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection. Clinical features include skin lesions, glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, and widespread vasculitis. Abstract Mixed cryoglobulinemia is a chronic immune complex-mediated disease strongly associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Mixed cryoglobulinemia is a vasculitis of small and medium-sized arteries and veins, […]

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A Post-cure Complication

Long-term drug therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection would prove to have persistent effects—both desirable and undesirable. A 29-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C, genotype 4, was to embark on a treatment regimen of oral ribavirin, 1000 mg, once daily and subcutaneous injections of pegylated interferon alfa-2b, 80 μg, once a week. At her […]

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