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Higher Fitness Is Strongly Protective in Patients with Family History of Heart Disease

Cardiorespiratory fitness protects against mortality; however, little is known about the benefits of improved fitness in individuals with a family history of coronary heart disease. We studied the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and risk of incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality, hypothesizing an inverse relationship similar to individuals without a family history of coronary […]

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Associations of Coffee, Tea, and Caffeine Intake with Coronary Artery Calcification and Cardiovascular Events

Coffee and tea are 2 of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. The association of coffee and tea intake with coronary artery calcium and major adverse cardiovascular events remains uncertain. Methods We examined 6508 ethnically diverse participants with available coffee and tea data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Intake for each was […]

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Online Educational Video Improves Bowel Preparation and Reduces the Need for Repeat Colonoscopy

  Unsatisfactory bowel preparation has been reported in up to 33% of screening colonoscopies. Patients’ lack of understanding about how a good bowel preparation can be achieved is one of the major causes. Patient education has been explored as a possible intervention to improve this important endpoint and has yielded mixed results. We compared the […]

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The Impact of Cardiorespiratory Fitness Levels on the Risk of Developing Atherogenic Dyslipidemia

  Low cardiorespiratory fitness has been established as a risk factor for cardiovascular-related morbidity. However, research about the impact of fitness on lipid abnormalities, including atherogenic dyslipidemia, has produced mixed results. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the influence of baseline fitness and changes in fitness on the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia. Methods […]

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The Call for a Physical Activity Vital Sign in Clinical Practice

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the most common shared occupational health risk is sedentary behavior. Physical inactivity increases the relative risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, hypertension, and osteoporosis by 45%, 60%, 30%, and 59%, respectively. Epidemiologic data suggest that physical inactivity is associated with an increased risk of 25 chronic diseases. Because approximately 90% […]

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