American Journal of Medicine, internal medicine, medicine, health, healthy lifestyles, cancer, heart disease, drugs

Falls and Delirium: Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome

An 85-year-old woman’s inability to remain standing was ultimately connected to an undiagnosed congenital defect. The patient was admitted to the geriatric unit of a university hospital for new frequent falls and subacute delirium, both of which began 1 month before presentation. Her medical history included ischemic stroke 10 years earlier, mild neurocognitive impairment, and […]

Read more
woman holding knee

An Approach to Myopathy for the Primary Care Clinician

Patients with muscle weakness are frequently encountered in the primary care clinic; however, the identification of an underlying disorder of muscle can pose a significant challenge. The aim of this review article is to provide a clinical and diagnostic framework to aid the primary care clinician in the detection and evaluation of suspected myopathies. Introduction […]

Read more
patient's view of surgery looking up at doctors

Appropriate Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors: A Double-Edged Sword

We read with great interest the article published by Wombell et al in the current issue of The American Journal of Medicine. The authors summarize the evidence linking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection.1 They also provide a description of the possible mechanisms responsible for this association. We commend the authors for their timely contribution to the […]

Read more

A Roadmap for Research on Resident Well-Being

Although well-being lacks a universally agreed-upon definition, it is generally understood to include both the presence of positive elements (eg, engagement, happiness, quality of life, meaning and fulfillment, and physical health) and the absence of negative elements (eg, physical illness, depression, anxiety, and burnout).1 In recognition of the challenges to well-being faced by residents during the […]

Read more
Joseph S. Alpert

Is Science Important? A Recent Lecture

Recently, I was invited to give a lecture in honor of MDs/PhDs graduating this year from Aarhus University in Denmark. The requested topic was “Is science important?” When I first received this invitation, I thought “Come on!! Is there really an educated, rational person living in the 21st century who thinks that science is not important?” […]

Read more
UA-42320404-1