American Journal of Medicine, internal medicine, medicine, health, healthy lifestyles, cancer, heart disease, drugs
nurse showing an elderly woman something on a tablet in office

Implications of Medicare’s Value-Based Payment Initiative for Specialty Health Systems

Despite the current uncertainty about the direction of health care reform in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) appears poised to transition from standard fee-for-service reimbursement to value-based payments in the coming years. These new models, which were codified in the Medicare Access and CHIP [Children's Health Insurance Program] Reauthorization […]

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On the Palms of His Hands: ACTH-Induced Hyperpigmentation

The prominent hyperpigmentation marking a patient’s skin was tied to his worsening diabetes mellitus type 2, though the connection was not immediately obvious. Five months prior to presenting to our institution, a 31-year-old man, whose diabetes type 2 had been well controlled for a long period of time, was evaluated in a private endocrinology practice […]

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Big Gain, No Pain: Tumoral Calcinosis

A patient’s odd physical presentation was the result of what could be termed a mineral deposit. The 40-year-old man reported that his right shoulder had been swelling progressively for more than 6 months. His medical history was significant for chronic kidney failure, and he had been undergoing hemodialysis for the previous 10 years. He had […]

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Dietary Patterns and Long-Term Survival: A Retrospective Study of Healthy Primary Care Patients

Dietary patterns are related to mortality in selected populations with comorbidities. We studied whether dietary patterns are associated with long-term survival in a middle-aged, healthy population. Methods In this observational cohort study at the Cooper Clinic preventive medicine center (Dallas, Tex), a volunteer sample of 11,376 men and women with no history of myocardial infarction […]

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A Service Commitment to Fund Your Medical Education

Student debt continues to explode, decreasing the attractiveness of a career in Medicine.1 The average US medical student graduates with about $190,000 in student loans,2 and many are even further in hock. The average Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) graduates even deeper in the hole, with $240,000 of student loans.3 Or, marry another medical student and double your […]

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