Tag Archives: Antibiotics
doctor uses tablet with patient

‘Urinary Tract Infection’ and the Microbiome

The current paradigm for managing uncomplicated “urinary tract infection” (“UTI”) is deeply flawed. “UTI” is ambiguously defined, and coupled with a belief that “bacteria are not normal inhabitants of the urinary tract,”1 the diagnosis often leads to unnecessary, harmful antibiotic treatment. Although bacteriuria identified by standard clinical cultures (which we will call standard bacteriuria) is central […]

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The Missing Antibody: The Pitfalls of ANCA Testing

A 44-year-old white woman presented to the hospital with acute shortness of breath while on a flight back to England from a holiday in Turkey. She denied having a productive cough, hemoptysis, or chest or calf pain. She was asthmatic, and her symptoms were improved by repeated administration of her salbutamol inhaler during the flight. […]

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