Tag Archives: Featured

Dueling Lungs: The Progression of Swyer-James Syndrome

Severe pulmonary hypertension led us to recommend surgery in the face of progressive Swyer-James syndrome. Presentation A 50-year-old African American woman presented to the Emergency Department with worsening pain over her left flank, chest, and back. The pain had been getting worse, especially in the morning, over the previous couple days and was described as […]

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Emphysematous Pancreatitis

A 63-year-old woman with a history of severe alcohol abuse presented with persistent abdominal pain radiating to the back, vomiting, and lassitude over a week. Examination showed tachycardia, abdominal tenderness, and bipedal edema. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated only fatty liver. Laboratory tests were notable for white blood cell count of 16.1 × 109/L, serum albumin 1.8 g/dL, and increased […]

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Platelet Count of Zero: A Curious Case of Thrombocytopenia

To read this article in its entirety please visit our website. -Patrick Twohig, MD, MPH, Jaclyn Rivington, MD This article originally appeared in the November 2017 issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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elder woman sick in bed with husband looking on

Advance Directives in Hospice Healthcare Providers: A Clinical Challenge

On a daily basis, healthcare providers, especially those dealing with terminally ill patients, such as hospice workers, witness how advance directives help ensure the wishes of patients. They also witness the deleterious consequences when patients fail to document the care they desire at their end of life. To the best of our knowledge there are […]

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American Journal of Medicine Editor Joseph Alpert

‘Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics’: Biostatistics and Prognostication for Patients

Quite often patients ask me to predict the future outcome of their illness: “How long can I expect to live with this illness, doctor, or how dangerous is the procedure that you are recommending?” A facile answer involves quoting data taken from clinical or epidemiologic studies, but this kind of information is rarely useful for […]

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