Tag Archives: healthy lifestyles
doctor gives a physical examination of a patient

Reducing Hospital Toxicity: Impact on Patient Outcomes

Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-hour oscillations in biologic processes that drive nearly all physiologic and behavioral functions. Disruption in circadian rhythms can adversely impact short- and long-term health outcomes. Routine hospital care often causes significant disruption in sleep-wake patterns that is further compounded by loss of personal control of health information and health decisions. We […]

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The Deficit of Nutrition Education of Physicians

Globally, death rates from cardiovascular disease are increasing, rising 41% between 1990 and 2013, and are often attributed, at least in part, to poor diet quality. With urbanization, economic development, and mass marketing, global dietary patterns have become more Westernized to include more sugar-sweetened beverages, highly processed foods, animal-based foods, and fewer fruits and vegetables, […]

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A Roadmap for Research on Resident Well-Being

Although well-being lacks a universally agreed-upon definition, it is generally understood to include both the presence of positive elements (eg, engagement, happiness, quality of life, meaning and fulfillment, and physical health) and the absence of negative elements (eg, physical illness, depression, anxiety, and burnout).1 In recognition of the challenges to well-being faced by residents during the […]

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Dietary Patterns and Long-Term Survival

Dietary patterns are related to mortality in selected populations with comorbidities. We studied whether dietary patterns are associated with long-term survival in a middle-aged, healthy population. Methods In this observational cohort study at the Cooper Clinic preventive medicine center (Dallas, Tex), a volunteer sample of 11,376 men and women with no history of myocardial infarction […]

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heart hovering over fast food

The Limited Public Health Impact of ‘Lifestyle’ Change

  Two main factors are responsible for premature disease and mortality. One is smoking, often referred to as a “lifestyle choice,” but better described as a “habit.” The other is poor nutrition resulting largely from the sugar, alcohol, salt, and saturated fat content (SASS components) of ready-to-consume food and drink, much of which is manufactured […]

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