Tag Archives: neurology
young female doctor examines x-ray

From Mechanical to Chemical: A Case of Diabetes Insipidus Induced by Concussive Brain Injury

Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by either absolute (central) or functional (nephrogenic) deficiency of vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone.1 Central diabetes insipidus is a recognized complication of traumatic brain injury; however, those patients are much sicker and have other symptoms from the trauma as well.2 We present a case of complete central diabetes […]

Read more
Magnetic resonance imaging brain lesions typical of multiple sclerosis.

Multiple Sclerosis Re-Examined: Essential and Emerging Clinical Concepts

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by exacerbations of neurological dysfunction due to inflammatory demyelination. Neurologic symptoms typically present in young adulthood and vary based on the site of inflammation, although weakness, sensory impairment, brainstem dysfunction, and vision loss are common. MS occurs more frequently in women […]

Read more

Headache

Headache, an almost universal human experience, is one of the most common complaints encountered in medicine and neurology. Described and categorized since antiquity, with the first classification by Aretaeus of Cappadocia, other classifications followed. The evaluation of this condition may be straightforward or challenging, and, though often benign, headache may prove to be an ominous […]

Read more
The trigeminocardiac reflex pathway diagram. 1) Trigeminal ganglion via sensory fibers of trigeminal nerve. 2) Sensory nucleus of trigeminal nerve. 3) Internuncial fibers. 4) Motor nucleus of the vagus nerve. 5) Efferent vagal nerve to the heart and stomach.

Trigeminocardiac Reflex as the Presentation of Maxillary Sinus Adenocarcinoma

A 54-year-old man with history of tobacco use presented to the Emergency Department with a few-hour history of dizziness and 2-month history of intermittent right jaw pain. His blood pressure was 68/48 mm Hg, heart rate was 55 beats per minute, and oxygen saturation was 85% on room air. Physical examination was notable for a […]

Read more
Computed tomography of the abdomen with contrast shows remarkable parietal peritoneal thickness (red arrow). Also noted is bilateral renal enlargement with innumerable renal cysts (yellow arrow), confirming diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease. There is a small amount of ascites and organization of loculated fluid collection (orange arrow) in the right upper quadrant. Small bowel dilatation (blue arrow) represents ileus.

Long-Term Peritoneal Dialysis May Result in Vascular Changes Within the Peritoneal Cavity, Leading to Reduced Efficacy of Intravenous Antibiotics in Treatment of Bacterial Peritonitis

Peritoneal dialysis is a home-based dialysis modality. In the US, 7.5% of the total dialysis population uses peritoneal dialysis.1 Peritoneal dialysis catheter-related peritonitis is a well-recognized complication, with an annual mortality rate as high as 16%.2 Although peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis treatment has been standardized, peritoneal dialysis catheter may require removal in cases of relapsing or refractory peritonitis […]

Read more
Atrophy of bilateral abductor halluces.

Diagnosing Bilateral Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a clinical condition characterized by pain and numbness involving the feet, and it occasionally spares the heels. It is often caused by physical compression by ganglion or posttraumatic change in the tunnel.1, 2 Cases of idiopathic bilateral tarsal tunnel syndrome have been reported, but not as many as expected, thereby rendering the entity […]

Read more
UA-42320404-1