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The patient's daughter provided us with these cell phone pictures (we obtained her written permission for publication); this first figure shows initial white plaques suggesting possible thrush.

Giant Cell Arteritis Presenting with a Tongue Lesion

An 83-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a 2-month history of progressive weight loss, weakness, and recent odynophagia. Her daughter first noticed her tongue with white plaques about 2 weeks prior to our admission (Figure 1). She was admitted to another hospital, treated for thrush, and discharged. Her tongue surface then developed a whitish […]

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Swelling on the upper lip (black arrow).

Strawberry Marks on Lip

A 32-year-old male patient presented with enlargement of his upper lip since childhood, which was compromising his facial aesthetics, as well as causing inability to close the mouth completely. History revealed the presence of a red spot on his lower lip when he was 2 months old, and it had increased considerably ever since. The […]

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Concomitant Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulants with Antiplatelet Agents and the Risk of Major Bleeding in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

  Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation commonly have comorbidities requiring concurrent use of oral anticoagulants and antiplatelets. There are no real-world data on the comparative safety of concomitant antithrombotic treatments in the era of direct oral anticoagulant (DOACs). Thus, we compared the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage, gastrointestinal bleeding, and other major bleeding between concomitant DOAC-antiplatelet […]

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Midclavicular and transaxial measurements of the liver.

How Strongly Do Physical Examination Estimates and Ultrasonographic Measurements of Liver Size Correlate? A Prospective Study

Liver size assessed by physical examination and ultrasound has long been used to gain useful clinical information. The size measurements obtained by these modalities have been difficult to compare as they are measured in 2 different axes (transaxial vs midclavicular). Our objective was to identify a measurement correlation between ultrasound and physical examination liver size […]

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A modified Epley maneuver for the treatment of left posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The head is turned 45° toward the left (A); then the patient reclines back with the head still turned left (B), and this position is maintained for approximately 30 seconds. If nystagmus is observed, the patient turns the head 90° toward the right side (C) while maintaining neck extension. The head-hanging-right position is then maintained for approximately 30 seconds. Next, the patient is turned further toward the right, into a side-lying position, such that the head is turned in the same direction, 90° beyond its last position; the nose should then be pointing in a direction that is about halfway between parallel and perpendicular to the floor (not shown). After approximately 30 seconds, the patient sits up. For the treatment of the right posterior canal variant, this procedure is followed with the modification of exchanging the words right and left. Treatments of the horizontal and anterior canal variants are outside the scope of this review.

Dizziness

  Dizziness is common, as reflected by the cost of assessing dizziness in U.S. emergency rooms, which reportedly exceeds $4 billion per year.1, 2 For many patients, the pathophysiology of dizziness will not be fully demonstrable by diagnostic tests. However, a systematic clinical approach allows for the identification of common forms of dizziness. Recognizing common patterns of […]

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Point-of-Care Ultrasound for the Assessment of Digital Clubbing

  Digital clubbing, a resultant finding from the proliferation of connective tissue in the terminal portion of fingers or toes, has long been recognized as a sign for a number of underlying infectious, inflammatory, malignant, and vascular conditions.1 A profile angle >176° and a hyponychial angle >192° support the diagnosis of clubbing.1Quantification of these angles can […]

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