Archive | dermatology RSS feed for this section
Raised nodular lesions on patient's shins at presentation.

Nodular Thyroid Dermopathy: Not a Hallmark of Graves Disease

  A 40-year-old man presented to the outpatient department with complaints of multiple, nontender, raised nodular lesions on his shins bilaterally for the past year (Figure 1). The lesions had an insidious onset and were progressively increasing in size. He was evaluated at an outside clinic. Biopsy was performed multiple times, and possibility of spindle […]

Read more
The patient also had hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin and soft tissue of the right thigh.

A Genetic Origin? Purpura Fulminans

Over days, a patient’s relatively small lesion evolved into widespread tissue damage. A previously healthy 49-year-old Arab woman was admitted for a 2-cm painful red lesion on her left breast. She had been well until a few days earlier, when she developed left flank pain and was treated with ofloxacin for a presumed urinary tract […]

Read more

A Bad Sign: Dermatomyositis with Interstitial Lung Disease

The presence of an autoantibody explained why a patient with dermatomyositis had respiratory symptoms. A 52-year-old man presented with a 1-month history of fever and rash, and a 2-week history of muscle pain and muscle weakness, which made it difficult for him to rise from a sitting position. The patient denied being a smoker or […]

Read more
The patient's posterior trunk was marked with pink urticarial papules and plaques.

Down the Rabbit Hole: Cutaneous Tuberculosis

The term “going down the rabbit hole,” based on Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, is a metaphor for an entry into the unknown, the disorienting, or the mentally deranging. Although the case of a patient with a nonhealing ulcer did not set us on a path with these exact qualities, it did remind us that […]

Read more
Black flies, also known as buffalo gnats or turkey gnats, are blood-feeding insects in the insect family simuliidae. Immature black flies breed in fast-flowing water, from which the adults emerge in great swarms (usually) in spring or early summer. Black flies are notorious nuisance pests in certain parts of the world and are vectors of the agent of onchocerciasis in tropical areas. Nuisance biting alone can be serious, even fatal, with many reports of livestock and poultry deaths due to black fly biting.1, 2, 3 Outbreaks were a major problem in the southern United States during the early 20th century1 but disappeared until recently. This reemergence may be due to the elimination of harsh pesticides and the cleaning up of creeks and rivers.

Black fly bite reactions include papules, erythematous wheals, indurations, or extensive swelling of the affected area.4 In addition, adenopathy (black fly stiff neck) may occur from bites on the face, neck, and scalp.2 There are many reports of reactions to black fly biting in the northern United States and other parts of the world,2,5, 6, 7 but none from the southern United States, where black flies have typically not been a problem. Here we carefully document the timeline of bites and subsequent development of cutaneous lesions in an entomologist who was investigating a black fly outbreak along the Pearl River in central Mississippi during the spring of 2018.

Methods
The entomologist bitten by black flies was examined by the second author and bite reactions were described and photographed over the following 72 hours. Samples of the offending insect were collected and identified as Simuliim meridionale.

Results
From March 26 to April 2, at least 10 black fly bites were noted on the patient's arms, neck, and face. Bite reactions sometimes developed into large indurations by 48 hours (Figure 1). Two bites on the neck were carefully followed for 48 hours (Figure 2). At first, there was nothing but erythema and a small hemorrhagic center. Four hours later, lesions developed into a central wheal with surrounding erythema. The diagnosis was papular urticaria, presumably resulting from hypersensitivity to black fly salivary proteins. A raised urticarial papule developed at each bite site with surrounding erythema that itched intensely. Over the course of 24 hours, the urticarial lesions resolved, leaving only an erythematous flattened lesion. By 48 hours, the lesions had completely faded.

Development and Resolution of Cutaneous Lesions Caused by Black Fly Bites (Diptera: Simuliidae)

Black flies, also known as buffalo gnats or turkey gnats, are blood-feeding insects in the insect family simuliidae. Immature black flies breed in fast-flowing water, from which the adults emerge in great swarms (usually) in spring or early summer. Black flies are notorious nuisance pests in certain parts of the world and are vectors of […]

Read more

Adult-Onset Still’s Disease: A Classic Presentation of a Rare Illness

Adult-onset Still’s disease is a rare inflammatory disorder of unclear etiology. Here, we highlight a classic presentation of this disorder. Case Description A 30-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of daily fevers, myalgias, 7.5-kg unintentional weight loss, and a 2-week history of diffuse skin rash. Her medical history was notable for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and […]

Read more
UA-42320404-1