American Journal of Medicine, internal medicine, medicine, health, healthy lifestyles, cancer, heart disease, drugs

Two New CME Courses on AJM Website

Two new continuing medical education (CME) courses have been uploaded to The American Journal of Medicine’s website recently.

Managing Chronic Pain with Nonopioid Analgesics: A Multidisciplinary Consult
Presenters: Daniel Clauw, MD, and Bill H. McCarberg, MD

Determining pain mechanism is important in selecting treatment for chronic musculoskeletal pain states. While broad classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, etc.) provide a framework, any combination of mechanisms may be present in a chronic pain patient. Growing evidence shows that pain states traditionally considered to be nociceptive (osteoarthritis, low back pain), may also involve elements of augmented central nervous system pain processing, and certain nonopioid analgesics, specifically certain SNRIs, can be effective in treating these conditions. Besides identification of biological pain mechanisms, chronic pain management also requires assessment of psychological and sociocultural factors that influence pain chronicity and patient prognosis. A multimodal/multidisciplinary approach incorporating pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy is important to improve outcomes in chronic pain patients.

Commercial Support: This activity is supported by an educational grant from Lilly USA, LLC. For further information concerning Lilly grant funding visit www.lillygrantoffice.com.
Review and Sponsorship: This multimedia activity was peer reviewed by The American Journal of Medicine and jointly sponsored by Purdue University College of Pharmacy and Health Education Alliance, Inc.

Invasive Mycoses: Evolving Challenges and Opportunities in Antifungal Therapy
A Case-based Discussion

Presenters: Michael A. Pfaller, MD, Luis Ostrosky-Zeichner, MD, FACP, FIDSA, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, MD, ScD, FACP, FIDSA, John R. Perfect, MD

The diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections remain a clinical challenge. Both the frequency of infections and resistance to antifungal agents continue to increase despite the introduction of new antifungal agents. While early diagnosis and intervention are essential for favorable outcomes, diagnoses of invasive mycoses is often difficult as current diagnostic methods are not sensitive or specific enough and may not be readily available to clinicians. In addition, the underlying disease of the host is a major contributor to the final clinical outcome and often may complicate the effective management of the mycosis.

The improvements in antifungal susceptibility testing methods to detect emerging resistance patterns coupled with molecular characterization of resistance mechanisms provide useful adjuncts to optimize the efficacy of antifungal therapy. The clinician’s familiarity with the latest diagnostic markers and techniques along with emerging data and safety and efficacy of antifungal agents will help guide clinical decisions.

Commercial Support: This activity is supported by an educational grant from Merck.
Review and Sponsorship: This multimedia activity was peer reviewed by The American Journal of Medicine and is jointly sponsored by Post Graduate Institute for Medicine and Global Education Exchange.

For a list of all CME courses on our website, check this link.

Comments are closed.

UA-42320404-1