Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Combating a Common Complaint (video)

Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder, manifesting as abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel function.  Despite affecting as many as 20% of adults, a lack of understanding of etiopathogenesis and evaluation strategies results in diagnostic uncertainty. In the August 2015 issue of The American Journal of Medicine, Sayuk and Gyawali detail modern […]

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Are e-Cigarettes Safe?

As the popularity of e-cigarettes increases, concerns are being raised about their safety and lack of regulation. E-cigarettes are not regulated or taxed like normal tobacco-containing cigarettes. Unlike nicotine inhalers, the exact chemical content of the liquid that is heated in the e-cigarettes is unknown, and e-cigarettes have not been clinically proven to promote smoking cessation. […]

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Women in High-Income Medical Ed Jobs Paid Less than Men

The existence of gender-based wage gaps in many occupations continues to be a hot-button topic in social and political debates. While much attention has been focused on medium- and lower-wage positions, some studies have shown that wage disparities extend to high-wage, high-prestige positions. According to a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine, […]

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48% of US Population Will Have Chronic Disease by 2020

  Chronic disease accounts for 7 of every 10 deaths in the United States and more than 75% of total health care costs. Among people 65 years old and older, over 92% suffer from one or more chronic diseases. By 2020, it is estimated that 48% of the total population will have chronic disease. In […]

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It Took a Village: Good’s Syndrome

A complex medical history became even more tangled when a 52-year-old man presented with a 4-week history of dry cough, dyspnea, weight loss, chills, subcutaneous nodules on his extremities, and fatigue. He had no fever. Initially, his primary care physician examined him and prescribed a course of clindamycin. Although the patient completed therapy, the nodules […]

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AJM’s Best of 2014: The Lives of Black Physicians in the South

Professor and Dr Richard D. deShazo et al’s series of articles dealing with the history of African American medical school applicants and physicians in the Deep South during the contentious years of desegregation represent the very best articles published in The American Journal of Medicine during 2014. Dr deShazo et al courageously detail the various ways in which discriminatory practices were used […]

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food

The Mediterranean Diet: What You Should Know

Diet fads are a dime a dozen, but one diet has risen about the rest in terms of effectiveness– the Mediterranean Diet. The American Journal of Medicine often publishes prevention-related articles that focus on diet, exercise, and lifestyle. Given the obesity epidemic, it’s important for physicians to be able to advise patients on weight management and […]

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Firearm-related Hospitalizations Track Ups & Downs of US Stock Market

Over 2001-2011, the national incidence of firearm-related hospitalizations has closely tracked the national stock market performance, suggesting that economic perturbations and resultant insecurities might underlie the perpetuation of firearm-related injuries, according to a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine. Although the fatality rates have remained stable over the last two decades, the […]

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Researchers Find Link between Persistent Insomnia and Increased Mortality Risk

A connection between persistent insomnia and increased inflammation and mortality has been identified by a group of researchers from the University of Arizona. Their study, published in The American Journal of Medicine, found that people who suffer from persistent insomnia are at greater risk than those who experience intermittent insomnia. Although about 20% of U.S. […]

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leisure time activity

Less Exercise, Not More Calories, Responsible for Expanding Waistlines

Sedentary lifestyle and not caloric intake may be to blame for increased obesity in the US, according to a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). A study published in The American Journal of Medicine reveals that in the past 20 years there has been a sharp decrease in […]

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homeless

Food Insecurity Is Linked to Medication Underuse

Chronically ill adults who reported food insecurity in their household (not having consistent access to food due to lack of financial stability) were significantly more likely to report cost-related medication underuse, according to a new study in The American Journal of Medicine,. The term cost-related medication underuse refers to taking less medication than prescribed, or […]

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blood pressure cuff

Should Your Blood Pressure Be Checked in Both Arms? YES!

As heart disease continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the United States, practitioners and patients alike are looking for ways to cut risk factors and identify new clues to assist with early detection. New research published in the March issue of The American Journal of Medicine suggests that there is […]

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peppers

Can a Healthy Diet Prevent Heart Disease?

A whole diet approach, which focuses on increased intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and fish, has more evidence for reducing cardiovascular risk than strategies that focus exclusively on reduced dietary fat, a study published in The American Journal of Medicine reveals. While strictly low-fat diets have the ability to lower cholesterol, they are not as conclusive in […]

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cycling

Exercise Is Just as Important as Your Medication

“They who are accustomed to daily labor, although even weak or old, endure it more easily than the robust or young who are unaccustomed to it.” Hippocrates Aphorisms1   I tell all my patients that frequent exercise is just as important as their medication in controlling their cardiovascular disease.2 In addition, I tell them that they […]

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