American Journal of Medicine, internal medicine, medicine, health, healthy lifestyles, cancer, heart disease, drugs

Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm in a Professional Body Builder

To the Editor: A 33-year-old otherwise healthy man presented with worsening epigastric and flank pain for 3 weeks. He denied having vomiting, diarrhea, fever, urinary symptoms, or history of kidney stones. His vital signs were significant for a blood pressure of 140/72 mm Hg and pulse rate of 94 beats/min. Acute coronary syndrome was excluded by electrocardiography. A […]

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The Frequency of Unnecessary Testing in Hospitalized Patients

Testing is an important part of medicine across all specialties and settings. As a result, the volume of testing is enormous, with an estimated 4-5 billion tests performed in the United States each year.1 Unnecessary laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is believed to be common. Studies looking at testing of patients have found 40%-60% of tests […]

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Different Causes of Death in Patients with Myocardial Infarction Type 1, Type 2, and Myocardial Injury

Data outlining the mortality and the causes of death in patients with type 1 myocardial infarction, type 2 myocardial infarction, and those with myocardial injury are limited. Methods During a 1-year period from January 2010 to January 2011, all hospitalized patients who had cardiac troponin I measured on clinical indication were prospectively studied. Patients with […]

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vegetable juices and veggies on a table

How Pure is PURE? Dietary Lessons Learned and Not Learned From the PURE Trials

The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) cohort studies add a new level of understanding of some key environmental components of health.1 The population is diverse, and represents individuals from various socioeconomic levels with a long period of follow-up. The dietary macronutrient analysis of this cohort conducted by the study group2 has yielded interesting findings, undoubtedly warranting additional […]

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senior woman about to get a diagnostic test

Cervical Cancer Screening: What’s New? Updates for the Busy Clinician

In the United States, 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, even though the screening for this disease is safe and effective. There are 3 types of screening options available: cervical cytology (Papanicolaou or “Pap” test), Pap/HPV (human papillomavirus) co-test, and HPV-only test. With simplified options such as HPV-only screening, providers who have been […]

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Cigarette Smoking in Persons Living with Hepatitis C: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2014

Cigarette smoking is common in persons living with hepatitis C (hepatitis C+), but national statistics on this harmful practice are lacking. A better understanding of smoking behaviors in hepatitis C+ individuals may help in the development of targeted treatment strategies. Methods We extracted data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and […]

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man holding his chest

Do Not Resuscitate Tattoos

A recent New England Journal of Medicine letter gained national attention by describing an emergency room visit by a patient with a tattoo on his chest, “Do Not Resuscitate.” The article told how the emergency room physicians, who had not encountered this issue before, contacted their medical ethics specialists to make sure they were complying with their […]

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nurse showing an elderly woman something on a tablet in office

Candid to the Bitter End: Indiscriminate Disclosures

  The physician’s obligation to tell the patient the full truth about his or her condition has become an established ethical principle, enabling patients’ autonomy, shared decision-making, and patient-centered care. However, indiscriminate application of this obligation may at times be harmful to the patient, contradicting the old Hippocratic imperative of “first do no harm” (“Primum […]

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man holding chest and woman offering him water

Oxygen Therapy in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

  Oxygen therapy is frequently used for patients with acute myocardial infarction. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of oxygen therapy versus no oxygen therapy in post–acute myocardial infarction settings. Methods A systematic search of electronic databases was conducted for randomized studies, which reported […]

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