American Journal of Medicine, internal medicine, medicine, health, healthy lifestyles, cancer, heart disease, drugs

Fraud in Academic Publishing: Researchers Under Cyber-Attacks

Day by day, researchers receive new suspicious e-mails in their inboxes. Many of them do not have sufficient information about these types of e-mails, and may become victims of cyber-attacks. In this short communication, we review current cyber threats in academic publishing and try to present general guidelines for authors. Nowadays, researchers often receive suspicious […]

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The Extent of Myocardial Injury During Prolonged Targeted Temperature Management After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

  The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent of myocardial injury by cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management of 24 hours vs 48 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods This randomized Scandinavian multicenter study compares the extent of myocardial injury quantified by area under the curve (AUC) of cardiac biomarkers during […]

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The Master Clinician’s Approach to Diagnostic Reasoning

“The value of experience is not seeing much, but in seeing wisely.” William Osler, MD “There are only three things that are important in medicine: diagnosis, diagnosis, diagnosis.” Charles Bryan, MD   Just as age, of itself, does not make a person wise, experience in medicine without clinical insight does not improve diagnostic skills. Clinical […]

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The Wrong Toothpaste and the Painful Burp

  Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is usually confined to the buccal mucosa, lips, and tongue. Rarely, the uvula may be involved. Although the disease is considered idiopathic, recurrences may be associated with the use of sodium lauryl sulfate-containing oral hygiene products. Objective To report a case of an aphthous ulcer located on the uvula, with an […]

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Joseph S. Alpert

How Can We Improve the Management of Patients with Hypertension?

Hypertension continues to be a major health problem in the United States, affecting more than 76 million US citizens. Despite marked improvement in detection and therapy of patients with hypertension over recent decades, substantial morbidity and mortality still occur, especially in the Southeastern United States. Hypertension detection programs are common throughout the country and can […]

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Chest Pain in a 39-Year-Old Man: What Could Be the Underlying Cause?

  A 39-year-old man with unremarkable past medical history, but with a positive family history for coronary artery disease, was admitted to the hospital because of persistent arterial hypertension and sudden-onset chest pain in the mid-substernal region with neck radiation. Assessment Results from physical examination were unremarkable. The 12-lead electrocardiogram and the cardiac biomarkers were […]

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Inside Out: Bone Marrow Necrosis and Fat Embolism

  Neurologic symptoms initially attributed to infection were ultimately the result of a devastating hematologic condition. The patient, a 57-year-old woman, was rushed to the emergency department for somnolence and slurred speech. She had experienced low back pain during the preceding week. Her medical history was notable for a ventriculoperitoneal shunt placed several years ago […]

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The Sweatshirt Sign: Coronary Artery Disease

  In one memorable case, the patient’s attire told physicians more about his health than the initial interview and physical examination. A 65-year-old veteran with a history of dyslipidemia, hypothyroidism, and post-traumatic stress disorder presented for a routine primary care visit and had no symptoms. He specifically denied having any chest pain. Assessment When asked […]

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medical residents walking down a hospital hall

Medical Humanities Coursework Is Associated with Greater Measured Empathy in Medical Students

  The primary focus of the study was to determine whether coursework in the medical humanities would ameliorate students’ loss of and failure to develop empathy, a problem known to be common during medical education. Methods Students were offered an elective course in the Medical Humanities for academic credit. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy Student […]

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The Tragedy of the Commons – Drug Shortages and Our Patients’ Health

  There has been, rightfully, a great deal of controversy related to the EpiPen pricing issue1; a preparation sold for $83 by Merck (Rockville, Md) a decade ago is now priced at $600. The fury directed at the company now marketing this drug-delivery device – Mylan (Canonsburg, Pa) – came from patients, families, and legislators; […]

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