American Journal of Medicine, internal medicine, medicine, health, healthy lifestyles, cancer, heart disease, drugs
woman in bed with icu

How the USPSTF’s Mammographic Screening Guidelines Should Be Interpreted

In 2016, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued their final recommendation for mammographic screening for breast cancer, advising women to undergo biennial screening between the ages of 50 and 74 years (B recommendation), and that the decision to undergo screening for women aged 40-49 years should be an individual one, and a woman may […]

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Dr. Joseph S. Alpert

Will Physicians Stop Performing Physical Examinations?

In the 21st century, debate continues concerning the value of the physical examination.1, 2, 3, 4 That such a hallowed and respected ritual of clinical medicine should even be questioned is the result of the remarkable advances during the last 50 years in imaging technology and laboratory medicine. When I was a student and resident in the late 1960s […]

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Hospital Admissions for Chest Pain Associated with Cocaine Use in the United States

The outcomes related to chest pain associated with cocaine use and its burden on the healthcare system are not well studied. Methods Data were collected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2001-2012). Subjects were identified by using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Primary outcome was a composite of mortality, myocardial infarction, […]

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doctor putting on gloves

Digital Rectal Exam: Still Relevant After All These Years (video)

In the world of high-tech medicine, the digital rectal exam still has a place. In this current study, researchers showed that performing the digital rectal exam on patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding provided valuable clinical information. American Journal of Medicine Editor-in-Chief Dr. Joseph S. Alpert explains the clinical implications of this research. (Get out your exam […]

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view of surgery from above with blood bag in view

Seronegative West Nile Virus Infection in a Patient Treated with Rituximab for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Seronegative West Nile virus infection has been described in organ transplant recipients and patients with cancer receiving rituximab in combination with other immunosuppressive therapies. We describe the first reported case of seronegative West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in a patient receiving rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis. A 49-year-old woman from Colorado with a history of rheumatoid arthritis […]

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Hypertestosteronemia and Infertility from a Mediastinal Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor

Extragonadal germ cell tumors are tumors of gonadal origin representing less than 5% of germ cell malignancies that form outside gonads. These are typically found in the mediastinum, retroperitoneum, or pineal gland. A 26-year-old man presented to the infertility clinic in January 2016 with a 2-year history of infertility. He had known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due […]

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Screening of Celiac Disease in Patients With Sarcoidosis?

Sarcoidosis and celiac disease (CD) are both autoimmune disorders, which have been associated with class II haplotype HLA-DR3, DQ2. Literature demonstrates this combination is more prevalent in the Irish population.1 Celiac disease is caused by the ingestion of gluten, where the predisposed population (HLA BQ2 or BQ8 carriers) develop antibodies against gluten peptides. The prevalence of […]

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Independent of Cirrhosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk Is Increased with Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary liver malignancy, commonly a sequelae of hepatitis C infection, but can complicate cirrhosis of any cause. Whether metabolic syndrome and its components, type II diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma independent of cirrhosis is unknown. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the MarketScan insurance […]

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Transverse Lines of the Nails

Four distinct, transverse, depressed lines (Figure, A) developed on the fingernails of a 73-year-old man with castration-resistant prostate cancer after 4 cycles of docetaxel-based chemotherapy; the lines were parallel and evenly spaced (Beau’s lines). Three transverse white bands (Figure, B) appeared on the fingernails of a 62-year-old woman with recurrent metastatic soft tissue sarcoma after […]

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